September 8, 2001

Parachute Industry Association Publications

PIA Standard Operating Procedure 322
Attachment B.  

Parachute & Skydiving awards presented by other organizations for which PIA members may be eligible. 

Drafted 04 Feb 01
Revised 04 Aug 01
by Dan Poynter
Adopted 08 Sep 01, Niagara Falls, Ontario.

 

PIA Logo  
The Parachute Industry Association 
3833 West Oakton Street 
Skokie, IL  60076 
telephone: 847-674-9742 
fax: 847-674-9743 

 


Attachment B.  

Parachute & Skydiving awards presented by other organizations for which PIA members may be eligible. 

The PIA Awards Committee shall recommend nominees for PIA consideration for major national and international awards, medals and other special recognition.  

Awards given to PIA members by other organizations brings attention and credibility to the PIA.


Award: 

Štefan Banič Gold Medal. 

Description: Štefan Banič (pronounced Bawnish)(1870-1941) was granted the first parachute patent (No. 1,108,484) August 25, 1914. A native of Slovakia, he emigrated to the U.S. in 1907 to work in the coalmines of Greenville, Pennsylvania.   

Eligilility:  

1. The applicant for the Gold Medal must serve at least 35 years in the skydiving community or airborne units as: parachute instructor, parachute rigger, DZ owner/Operator, jump-plane pilot. 

2. For invention, recognized by the parachute industry, of a device or process that either improves the safety of the sport, functionality of equipment, or creatively enhances the sport in a safe manner.  

3. For a single act of bravery enacted with the sole desire to prevent serious injury or death to a fellow skydiver. 

4. For exemplary service(s) exhibited to promote awareness of Štefan Banič and the foundation via organizing, supporting, sponsoring or hosting parachute competitions and other special events with the goal to promote the sport of skydiving and/or Štefan Banič.  

Special Considerations

1. The Gold Medal can be awarded to VIPs from any nation that is directly involved in Štefan Banič skydiving memorial events, promotions and/or celebrations.  

2. The gold Medal may also be awarded to financial supporters of the Štefan Banič Parachute Foundation and the Foundation’s goal to support the sport of skydiving in remembrance of Štefan Banič.  

Awarded by:

Štefan Banič Parachute Foundation, Slavo Mulik, PO Box 2737, Coppell, TX 75019. Tel: 972-462-8791. Slavo@airmail.net 

Past Recipients: 

1998: Ted Strong
1999: Bill Booth
2000: Col. Joe Kittinger, Jr.
2001: Dan Poynter
2002:  

Submission procedures:

Submit with details outlined to Štefan Banič Parachute Foundation, Slavo Mulik, PO Box 2737, Coppell, TX 75019. Tel: 972-462-8791. Fax: 972-462-8791. Slavo@airmail.net. The Board of Directors of the Štefan Banič Parachute Foundation will give all applicants fair consideration.

Deadline date: none.

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Award: 

Annual FAA Aviation Mechanic Safety Award.

Eligibility: Given to the aviation mechanic (presumably including parachute riggers) making the most outstanding contribution to air safety by maintenance practices. See AC 60-2N 

Awarded by: Federal Aviation Administration and the aviation industry.  

Past Nominees and Recipients: 

1988: PIA nominated Mike Smith
1991 PIA re-nominated Mike Smith. 

Submission procedures: Details and entry blanks are available from FBOs, GADOs and FSDOs.

Note: There is no information on this AC on the FAA web site.  

Deadline date: July


Award: 

SAFE Award for Career Achievement 

Eligibility: Presented to the person who, throughout his or her career, has made significant contributions to the field of safety.  

Awarded by: SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.  

Past Recipients:

1993  Captain Harold T. Pheeny
1994  Professor Guy Illich Severin
1995  Basil Macnab
1996  Richard H. Frost
1997  MCPO Larry Farmer
1997  Orland Wilcox
1997  Robert J. Zimmerman
1998  William J. Sears, Ph.D.
1999  Dominic Spinosa
1999  J. A. “Tony” vanHaastert
2000  E. R. Richard (Dick) Atkins

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.

Deadline date: August 16.

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Award:

SAFE Award for Individual Achievement 

Eligibility: Presented to the person who has made recent outstanding contribution in the field of safety. This may have been through leadership or through advancement in the knowledge, science or engineering associated with a significant improvement in safety or survival.  

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com

1993 Larry Specker
1994  Joseph L. Haley, Jr.
1995  H. Lee Task, Ph.D.
1996  Roy R. Rasmussen
1997  Danny Filipovich
1998  Curtis D. White
1999  James O. Lair
2000  John A. Plaga 

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.

Deadline date: August 16.


Award: 

SAFE Award for Team Achievement 

Eligibility: Presented to the team that has made a recent outstanding contribution in the field of safety through advancement in the knowledge, science or engineering associated with a significant improvement in safety or survival.  

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com  

Past Recipients:

1993  NAWC CBR Team
1993  Head/Neck Biodynamics Criteria Team
1994  K-36 International Test Team
1995  Finnish Air Force (FAF) Aircrew        Equipment Evaluation Team
1996  NAWCADWAR Advanced Technology          Crew Station Team
1997  Carl Naab and Stan Wojdan
1998  Fourth Generation Escape System   Technologies Team
1999  Transportation Safety Board of Canada –   Swiss Air 111 Team
2000  Hurricane Mesa Test Team 

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.

Deadline date: August 16.

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Award: 

SAFE Meritorious Service Award 

Eligibility: Presented to the person or persons who demonstrate a recent outstanding contribution to survival through courage or bravery. 

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com  

Past Recipients:

1969  Lou Abraham
1970  Major James R. Yacobi
1971 Donald Lee
1972  Lt. Col. George C. Braue
1973  Michael R. Grost
1974  Lt. Col. Charles A. Lehman
1975  Capt. Charles Nowlin
1976  Gilbert A. Pelawook
1977  Anthony Martino
1978  Glen McDonald and John Kenney
1979  CMSGT Ronald Ziegler
1980  Richard Duran
1981  Capt. C. Thomas Lindemann and Lt. Col. Alfred Schneider
1982  Ms. Kelly Duncan
1983  Cal Crochet
1984  F-106 B Storm Hazards Research Flight Crew
1985  Jean Gueridon
1986  Bernard Lynch
1987  Lewis T. Vinson
1988  Harry W. Schmoll ***
1989  Gregory T. Robertson ***
1990 Captain Al C. Haynes
1991  Captain Tom Cooper
1992  SSGT Charles B. Wade
1993  Major M. Maccauley, MWO; J.A.E. Maccauley, MWO,  F.,J. Ritchie and crews
1994  No recipient
1995  24MEU Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel Team
1996  No recipient
1997  Federal Express Flight 1406 Flight Crew and Federal Express Training Organization
1998  No recipient
1999  Helicopter Composite Squadron Two (CDR Scott White and Crew)
2000  SSGT Richard D. Dixon and Captain Edward J. Lengel 

*Parachutists 

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.  

Deadline date: August 16.

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Award:

General Spruance Award 

Eligibility: Presented for outstanding contribution to safety through education.  

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com  

Past Recipients:

1969  General William W. Spruance
1970  A. Howard Hasbrook
1971  SMSGT Thomas Linam
1972  Stanley Pain
1973  John X. Stefanki
1974 No recipient
1975  Staff, Physiological Training Branch,          USAFSAM
1976  Col. Giles W. Hall
1977 Joshua S. Mann
1978  Dr. Wayne Chesbro
1979 U.S. Army Institute for Military Assistance, Military Free Fall Division
1980  Col. Donald C. Choisser
1981  Gerald L. Johnson
1982  Dr. S. Harry Robertson
1983  Dr. Ted S. Ferry
1984  Division of Aviation Safety Management and Training (Department of the Interior)
1985  Robert McLaughlin
1986  TSGT Cecil Ginger
1987  CMSGT William W. Wood
1988 Jimmy L.  Whitley
1989  No recipient
1990  Professor William D. Waldock
1991  Michael A. Acosta
1992  Charles O. Miller
1993  Kent K. Gillingham, M.D., Ph.D.
1993  Dr. James W. Turnbow
1994  Kevin Hiatt
1995  Captain Scott O’Grady, USAF
1996  Charles “Skip” Goodman
1996  Ted Putnam, Ph.D.
1997  Captain Alan Price
1997  John H. Starnes
1998  RADM Frank M. “Skip” Dirren
1999  Captain B. J. Smith
2000  Richard F. Healing 

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.  

Deadline date: August 16.


Award: 

M.P. Koch Award

Eligibility: In recognition of those members of industry who have made significant contributions in the advancement of hardware for safety and survival applications.

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com

Past Recipients:

1973  Ralph E. Darling, Sr.
1974  Kenneth A. Marks
1975  John Tillman
1976  C. Donald Bateman
1977  John C. Goodell
1978  Leslie Irvin **
1979  Bernard Mazelsky
1980  Maurice W. Connell
1981  Douglas Aircraft Co.
1982  Byron Solomonides
1983  Clifford Bonn
1984  Richard H. Frost
1985  Homer D. Reihm
1986  Harold G. Watson
1987  Donald G. Davis
1988  Everett B. Skinner
1989  Morry L. Schimmel
1990  David L. Heitman
1991  Walter R. Peck
1992  Brian L. Carnell
1993  Francis Miller
1994  Robert L. Cramer
1995  No recipient
1996  Peter Zatezalo
1997  James W. Duncan
1998  W. Harvey Jagoe
1999  Roy Spaulding
2000  John Henneman

** Parachutist

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.

Deadline date: August 16.

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Award: 

Michael R. Grost Award 

Eligibility:

Presented to individual(s) who have made significant contributions to the life sciences area through leadership and evolutionary accident investigation using scientific mishap analysis, investigative study, and historical documentation, leading to system design improvements that enhance the life-saving potential of aircraft/spacecraft egress systems or life support systems. 

Awarded by:

SAFE Association, 107 Music City Circle, #112, Nashville, TN 37214.

Tel: 615-902-0056; Fax: 615-902-0077; SAFE@usit.net

http://www.SAFEassociation.com  

Past Recipients

2000 Bob Swaim 

Submission procedures: The person making the nomination must be a current SAFE member or Corporate Designee. Nominee need not be a SAFE member. Send for nomination form.  

Deadline date: August 16.


Award: 

USPA Achievement Award

A. Introduction (See http://www.USPA.org, Governance Manual.

1. Perhaps the most respected honor that is offered by the United States Parachute Association is the USPA Achievement Award, which was originally conceived and created in 1970, as a result of an initial gift of $3,000 from an “Anonymous Donor.”

2. The sum was eventually enlarged to a total of $30,000 over a period of years and the funds were placed on deposit with the National Aeronautic Association, which agreed to administer them on behalf of the United States Parachute Association, for the purpose of underwriting the cost of a variety of perpetual competition trophies; as well as the Achievement Award.

3. The fund ceased to exist in 1982 when the final money available was used to construct the floor-to ceiling display cases at USPA’s new Headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia, in which all USPA trophies are now displayed.

4. The agreement signed on May 13, 1970, between Attorney John Kerr Wilson, acting for the “Anonymous Donor;” General Brooke E. Allen, Executive Director of the National Aeronautic Association, acting for the National Aeronautic Association; and Dr. Edward A Fitch, president of the United States Parachute Association, acting for USPA, stipulates (among other things) that at any time on or after May 13, 1975 the “Anonymous Donor” may identify himself and direct that any and all awards created through his gift carry his name. To date the “Anonymous Donor” has not seen fit to utilize this privilege. 

B. Qualifications for the Award: The May 13, 1970 agreement, as accepted by USPA, describes the award itself and the qualifications required of recipients, using this language: “To provide a bowl or other suitable trophy to be known initially as ‘The United States Parachute Association Achievement Award’, which shall be perpetual and will be awarded annually to an expert active or retired sport parachute jumper in recognition of outstanding sportsmanship, skill, or personal contribution to the sport of parachuting and the United States Parachute Association, its goals and purposes. The recipient of such award will be selected by the board of directors by a majority vote during a closed regular or special meeting. In the event a majority of the board of directors cannot agree upon a recipient of such award on account of a lack of preeminence of the sport parachutist in any one year, the award will be made at least once each two years. Such trophy will be kept permanently in an appropriate location to be determined by the board of directors.” 

C. Description of Trophy: 

1. The trophy itself is a sterling silver bowl, 15 inches in diameter, seated on an octagonal teakwood base which bears carved wooden replicas of the USPA emblem on four faces and sterling silver plates listing the names and qualifications of recipients of the award on the other four faces. 

2. Traditionally, each year the recipient receives a smaller, eight-inch diameter replica silver bowl as his or her personal possession. 

D. Other Considerations: 

1. Following the vote of the USPA Board of Directors selecting a recipient, the Chair of the USPA Membership Services Committee or some other volunteer prepares an article for Parachutist Magazine explaining the merits of the recipient and the reasons for the decision of the board. 

2. The award is presented at an appropriate occasion where many USPA members are likely to be present. Traditionally the award is made for the year prior to the year in which it is presented. 

3. While the deed of gift requires that the award be given only to an individual, in 1974, the presentation was made to the United States Army Parachute Team, which suggests that the language in the deed is usable more as a guideline than as a strict requirement. 

4. The Membership Services Committee and the board has usually regarded the statement, “In recognition of … personal contribution to … the United States Parachute Association, its goals and purposes” as an overriding requirement (i.e., achievements in sport parachuting unrelated to the United States Parachute Association would normally not be considered sufficient to qualify a recipient, lacking specific contributions to USPA). 

5. While the deed of gift states that the award must be made at least once every two years, neither in 1991 nor in 1992 was a recipient named, thereby again suggesting that this particular language serves more as a guideline than as a requirement. 

6. No current member of the USPA Board of Directors may be recommended for the USPA Achievement Award during his or her term as a member of the board. 

a. In practice, this requirement has been extended to forbid a nomination for at least two full years after the end of board service 

b. It is enlarged to include as ineligible current or former USPA employees, also until at least two years after their employment ends 

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: USPA, 1440 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314.

 http://www.USPA.ORG  

Past Recipients:

1971 Joe Crane (posthumously)—“For unselfish and dedicated service as Founder, president, and Chairman of the Board of the National Parachute Jumpers and Riggers and its successor, the Parachute Club of America.” 

1972 Lew Sanborn, D-1—“For originating safe and reliable parachute equipment, for pioneering work in freefall photography, and for many other contributions to the sport and USPA.” 

1973 Steve Snyder, D-5—“For pioneering contributions through the years to the saving of lives and the improvement of parachute equipment.” 

1974 United States Army Parachute Team—“Generous and dedicated sportsmen, celebrated competitors, respected leaders who since 1961 have introduced parachuting at its best to worldwide millions and have brought honor and distinction to the sport.” 

1975 Lowell Bachman—“For service to the United States Parachute Association and all competitors as judge and chief judge at countless national championships, and as a dedicated leader in the development of judging excellence.” 

1976 No award. 

1977 Russ Gunby—“A founding spirit who saw the future when others doubted. As author, executive director, and PCA. president, he gave countless hours to build the early framework of our sport.” 

1978 Len Potts—“In recognition of personal sacrifice and countless contributions to skydiving and this organization spanning our decades as a sport. His past is our present.” 

1979 No award. 

1980 Dan Poynter—“Prolific author, distinguished instructor, preeminent parachutist, whose service to skydiving spans more than 20 active years.” 

1981 Norman E. Heaton—“In eleven years of devoted service as executive director, he contributed substantially and uniquely to USPA’s greatest growth.” 

1982 No award. 

1983 James F. “Curt” Curtis—“A total contributor to our sport and USPA: competitive champion, headquarters executive, drop zone owner, safety officer, director, board chairman.” (For some reason, his service as USPA president was not recorded.) 

1984 Chuck MacCrone—“In recognition of outstanding contributions to sport parachuting and as a testament to his unparalleled service as president, FAI-IPC.” 

1985 No award. 

1986 Jack Bergman (posthumously)—“USPA Director 1967-1984, Treasurer 1967-1984, National Championships Meet Director 1975-1984. With selfless devotion he gave a quarter century to skydiving and USPA.” 

1987 Carl Boenish (posthumously)—“A prolific and talented skydiver whose lifetime of pioneering freefall photography brought unforgettable images and better understanding to fellow jumpers and the public.” 

1988 No award. 

1989 J. Scott Hamilton—“For service to USPA and the skydiving world 1967-1979, a Collegiate League director, Safety and Training Committee chairman, and USPA president.” 

1990 Ken Coleman (posthumously) — “World and national champion who created the accelerated freefall program.” 

1991 No award. 

1992 No award. 

1993 Loy Brydon, D-12 — “In recognition of major contributions to parachuting in the development of equipment, freefall techniques and competition—an original role model of the total skydiver.” 

1994 William H. Ottley, D-298 — “In recognition of more than three decades of dedicated service to skydiving and USPA, as board member, vice-president and executive director.” 

1995 Dick Barber, C-2375—“For dedicated service to all competitors as a judge at countless U.S. Nationals and world championships, and for the inspiration provided to judges.” 

1996 No award. 

1997 Clint Vincent—“Selfless service for the betterment of all aspects of skydiving and in support of all skydivers.” 

1998 Patrick M. Moorehead—“For unselfish dedication to the United States Parachute Association since 1969 as an ambassador extraordinaire while traveling the world as a member of the board of directors and as a professional skydiving performer.” 

1999
2000 

Submission procedures: (see Above) 

Deadline date:
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Award: 

USPA Gold Medal for Meritorious Achievement 

A. Background: 

1. Second only to the USPA Achievement Award in prestige, the USPA Gold Medal for Meritorious Achievement was established on July 13, 1997 by the USPA Board of Directors. 

2. The award given to the recipient is in the form of a struck brass medal which measures three inches in diameter, weighs approximately five ounces and is slotted at the top for attachment of a 30” gold fabric ribbon. 

3. For permanent display at USPA Headquarters is a large wooden plaque measuring two feet by four feet and adorned with an exact replica of the medal along with brass metal strips bearing the name and date of each recipient. 

B. Criteria for the award: 

1. The USPA Gold Medal for Meritorious being considered from those nominations presented by the selection committee. 

F. Presentation Of the Award: The USPA Gold Medals for Meritorious Achievement are presented annually at a time and place selected by the President of the United States Parachute Association. 

G. Nomination Procedures: 

1. identify the nominee, including address and telephone number 

2. prepare the citation in 30 words or less capturing the essence of the achievement for which the nominee’s name has been submitted 

3. give complete, concise details justifying the award to the nominee, with pertinent background information to assist the selection committee 

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: USPA, 1440 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314.

http://www.USPA.ORG  

Past Recipients

1997 Lorrie Young—“In recognition of outstanding achievement as a National and International Judge in all skydiving disciplines. Her unwavering dedication to fairness and integrity brought honor, as well as equality, to the judging profession.” 

1999 Jimmy Godwin—“For outstanding and meritorious service to the skydiving community and for sharing his knowledge for over three decades as a Drop Zone owner, rigger examiner, pilot, instructor and Conference Director.” 

1999 Jerry Bird—“For outstanding and meritorious service to the skydiving community for over thirty years, inspiring jumpers into becoming competitors and for unselfish training and organizing in the field of relative work.” 

Submission procedures: (See above)  

Deadline date:


Award: 

The Paul Tissandier Diploma and Group Diploma of Honor of the Fèdèration Aèronautique Internationale (FAI). 

a. Annual awards of the FAI carry world-wide distinction. Skydivers are eligible for only two of the various FAI citations: the Tissandier Diploma and the Group Diploma of Honor. 

b. The Tissandier Diploma is usually awarded to an individual while the Group Diploma of Honor, as its name implies, honors achievement by groups or organizations. 

c. Both are awarded for “during the previous years, serving the cause of  aviation in general, and private and sporting aviation in particular, by their work, initiative, and devotion in other ways.” 

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: Fèdèration Aèronautique Internationale Headquarters, Avenue Mon Repos 24, 1005 Lausanne, Switzerland 

Past Recipients:

1978
1979 Dan Poynter, President CIVL.
1980
1981
1982  

Submission procedures:  

Deadline date:

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Award: 

The Leonardo da Vinci Diploma and the FAI Parachuting Gold Medal are special awards for which only parachutists are eligible and which are awarded by the International Parachuting Committee (IPC) each year. 

a. The Leonardo da Vinci Diploma is awarded by the IPC to a male or female parachutist who has (any of the following): 

(1) at least three times consecutively won a National Overall Championship title 

(2) at least once won the World Absolute Individual Parachuting Championship and twice the title of Combined Champion (male or female) at a recognized international parachuting competition 

(3) or served twice as chief judge at a recognized international competition and at least once at a recognized World Parachuting Championships, or served at least three times consecutively as an international judge at a recognized World Parachuting Championships 

(4) established at least three world parachuting records 

(5) or served at least twice as meet director at a recognized international parachuting competition and at least once at a recognized World Parachuting Championship 

(6) or been nominated as honorary president of the International Parachuting Committee (IPC) 

(7) served for at least ten consecutive years, including the current year, as a national delegate to the IPC 

b. Only one Leonardo da Vinci Diploma is awarded annually, and each year each active member of the FAI may propose one candidate from his or her country, such submission to be signed by the president or vice president of the FAI member organization. 

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: International Parachuting Commission (IPC) of the FAI. Fèdèration Aèronautique Internationale Headquarters, Avenue Mon Repos 24, 1005 Lausanne, Switzerland 

Past Recipients

Submission procedures: (See above) 

Deadline date:


Award:  

The FAI Parachuting Gold Medal and The Leonardo da Vinci Diploma and are special awards for which only parachutists are eligible and which are awarded by the International Parachuting Committee (IPC) each year. 

The Parachuting Gold Medal is awarded annually by the IPC to honor “an outstanding accomplishment in connection with parachuting,” which “could be in the realm of sport, safety, or. . . an invention.” Each year each active FAI member may propose one candidate from his country, who however may

not be a currently seated member of the IPC, such submission to be in writing and signed by the president or vice president of the FAI member organization. 

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: International Parachuting Commission (IPC) of the FAI. Fèdèration Aèronautique Internationale Headquarters, Avenue Mon Repos 24, 1005 Lausanne, Switzerland 

Past Recipients

Submission procedures: (See above) 

Deadline date:


Award: 

The Frank G. Brewer Trophy of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Frank G. Brewer Trophy, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c. The Brewer Trophy, awarded annually, is given to an individual, group or organization “for the most outstanding contribution to the development of air youth in the field of education and training.” 

d. The Frank G. Brewer Trophy was established in 1943 by Frank G. Brewer in honor of his two sons and the one and a half million other American youths put into the air by World War II. NAA has administered the Trophy since it was founded.

Eligibility: (see Above 

Awarded by: National The Frank G. Brewer Trophy Selection Committee is appointed annually by the President of the National Aeronautic Association. The size of the Selection Committee is determined by the President of NAA. 

Past Recipients:
1943
Civil Aeronautics Administration

For The Civilian Pilot Training Program, Making It Possible For 250,000 Youths, 15 To 18 Years Of Age, To Exploit Their Interest In Aviation, By Availing Themselves Of Aviation Education On A Nation Wide Basis In High Schools.

1944
Dr. Edgar Fuller, Assistant Director, Aviation Education Program Of The Civil Aeronautics Administration

For The Outstanding Contribution Of Air Youth, In His Work As Assistant Director Of Aviation Education, Civil Aeronautics Administration. Dr. Fuller Worked In Each Of The 48 States For Organization Of Various Phases Of Aviation Education In Elementary And Secondary Schools, As Well As Colleges.

1945
Dr. Huber W. Hurt, Director Of Development And Research, Boy Scouts Of
America

For His Outstanding Contribution To The Education Of American Youth, Through His Work In The Air Scouting Movement. He Organized A System Of Incentive Awards For The Study Of Aviation By Members Of The Boy Scouts. He Authored The Scout Hand Book, "The Yearbook Of Aviation For Young Men."

1946
Dr. Frank E. Sorenson, Associate Professor Of Education, University Of
Nebraska

Dr. Sorenson's Work Was Recognized In Determining Just What Knowledge Teachers Must Have To Effectively Instruct Pupils For Air-Minded Youth. He Prepared Such Books As, "Elements Of Pre-Flight Aeronautics" And "Now We Fly." He Was Frequently A Consultant To Naa On Aviation Matters.

1947
Dr. Nickolaus L. Englehardt, Jr., Air Age Education Research
For His Active Participation In The Field Of Air Age Education In Building Up Valuable Aviation Teaching Aids, Plus His 1947 Teaching Development, "Flying Classrooms."

1948
Philip S. Hopkins, President, Board Of Education,
Binghampton, New York

For Almost A Dozen Air Age Education Activities. Outstanding Was His Origin And Promotion Of The Idea Of An Air Age Center In Each School To Contain Visual Aids, Wall Charts, Pictures, Maps, Magazines, Etc., Which Could Be Used By Teachers. Mr. Hopkins Traveled To Over 13,000 Teachers On Aviation Subjects. His Trainer, Similar To A Small Plane, Led To The Development Of The "School Link" Now Used In Many Schools Throughout The Nation.

1949
Mrs. Elsie W.
Adams, Supervisory Teacher, Denver Public Schools
For Her Practical And Effective Application Of Aviation To The Processes Of Education. Her Efforts Made The Denver School System One Of The Most Advanced In The Nation In Aviation Education Work. She Wrote Numerous Articles And Outlines For Instruction On Aviation Education For Leading Education Journals. 

1950
Senior Lt. John H. Burton, Usn

For Inspiring And Effective Leadership In Planning And Carrying Out The 1950 Air Youth Education And Model Airplane Programs Of The Us Navy.

 

1951
Dr. Harold E. Mehrens, Supervisor Of The Aviation Education Program, Civil Aeronautics Administration


Dr. Mehrens Conducted Ground School Courses Of The Caa's Civil Pilot Training Program And Prepared Instructional Material In Navigation And Meteorology, And Qualified For All Seven Of The Ground School Ratings. He Served With Caa's Foreign National Program, Authored Numerous Magazine Articles And Books Including "Adventures In Aviation Education."

1952
Civil Air Patrol
In Recognition Of The Thousands Of Volunteer Civil Air Patrol Members Who Have Unselfishly Devoted Their Time And Effort In The Development Of The Cap Cadet And Teaching Training Program.

1953
Dr. Leslie A. Bryan, Director, Institute Of Aviation, University Of Illinois
Dr. Bryan, Author Of Numerous Books And Articles On Many Aviation Subjects, Specifically Developed A Program For Students And The Faculty Of The University Of Illinois Which Has Supervised The Training Of Over 7,000 Without A Single Injury.

1954
Dr. John H. Furbay, Director, Air World Education, Trans World Airlines
For His Outstanding Contribution To The Development Of Air Youth In The Field Of Education And Training Through His Effective And Inspirational Series Of Talks To Teachers About The Responsibilities Of Citizenship In The Air Age.

1955
Willis C. Brown
For Services Rendered In Seeking, Through Group Action, To Interest More Youths In Some Phase Of Aviation Through Classroom And Experience-Type Programs.

1956
Ray O. Mertes
For Distinguished And Unselfish Service To The Youth Of America Through His Leadership In The Field Of Aviation As A School Administrator, Lecturer, Author And Director Of The School And College Services Of United Airlines.

1957
Edwin A. Link
Whose Inventive Genius Has Resulted In The Development Of Simulators And Other Devices Which Directly Contributed To The Education Of Hundreds Of Thousands Of Aviators And Whose Unselfish Dedication To Aviation Education Resulted In His Establishing And Liberally Endowing The Link Foundation Which Will Provide, For Years To Come, Financial Support For Students And Research In The Field Of Aviation Education And Training.

1958
Dr. Evan Evans
For Outstanding Service To Aviation Education As The Executive Director Of The National Aerospace Education Council, And As A Teacher And School Administrator With A National Reputation In Aviation Education.

1959
Dr. Paul E. Garber, Head Curator And Historian, National Air Museum
For Thirty-Eight Years Of Outstanding Service To Youth And Their Education In Aviation By Planning, Providing, And Displaying Education Exhibits In The National Air Museum.


1960
George N. Gardner, Pan American World Airways, Inc.
As Education Director Of Pan American Airways, For His Singular Contribution To Aviation Education Through The Publication Of Materials Tailored Specifically To Classroom Use, Through Educational Travel, And Through The Development And Administration Of An Original And Highly Educational Model Aviation Event.

1961
James V. Bernardo
For Developing A Plan Of National Space Mobile Demonstration Units To Supplement High School Science Programs; Personally Organizing And Teaching Thirty-Two Aviation Education Workshops In Twenty-One United States Colleges Prior To Joining Nasa; And Authorship Of The Book "Aviation In The Modern World," Which Covered Both Aviation And Space Exploration.

1962
Dr. Merlyn Mclaughlin
For Distinguished And Unselfish Service To Aviation Education Over A Period Of Years As A Writer And Lecturer, A Pioneer Aviation Teacher And Administrator, A Civil Air Patrol Leader, And An Officer Of The United States Air Force.

1963
Marilyn Link
For Her Distinguished And Outstanding Meritorious Service To The Air Youth Of America In Aerospace Education, And For Her Work Towards The Stimulation, Guidance, Encouragement And Inspiration Of Young Minds To Make Some Truly Great Accomplishments In Aviation And Aviation Safety. Her Personal Participation In Programs For The Link Foundation And Aerospace Education Have Encompassed Eighteen Colleges And Universities From Massachusetts To The State Of Washington, And From Michigan To Texas. The Programs Have Embraced Fellowships, Scholarships, Workshops, Seminars And Conferences.

1964
Gill Robb Wilson
For His Writing, His Speaking And His Devoted Public Service, Which Has Brought The Message Of Aerospace To The Minds And Hearts Of The American Young People. He Has Translated The Knowledge And Skills Of The Flyer Into The Language That Is Both Meaningful And Inspirational To The Millions Of Young People Who Have Heard Him Speak And Read His Prose And Poetry. His Entire Career Has Been One Of Education, In The Fullest And Finest Sense.

1965
Mrs. Jane N.
Marshall
For Her Contributions To Enlarged Aerospace Horizons For Those Who Teach Our Nation's Youth. Through Her Creative Writing In Educator-Oriented Aerospace Publications, Her Development Of Timely Bibliographies And Teaching Aids, And Her Leadership In The Organization And Administration Of Aerospace Education Work Shops For Teachers, She Has Contributed Significantly To Fuller Understanding Of The Impact Of Flight Upon All Americans.

1966
Dr. Mervin K. Strickler, Jr.
For His Continuous And Enthusiastic Contributions To The Education Of Youth As To The Place Of Aviation In Their Lives Today And Its Promises And Challenges For Tomorrow; For His Energetic, Imaginative And Innovative Programs As Special Assistant For Aviation Education, Office Of General Aviation Affairs Of The Federal Aviation Agency, Which Have Brought The Educational Community In Closer Contact With Aviation; For The Inspiration And Encouragement He Has Given To Thousands Of Teachers And Students; For His Past Leadership Of The National Program Of Aviation Education Of The Civil Air Patrol; And For His Long Years Of Service As A Charter Member And Officer Of The National Aerospace Education Council.

1967
Dr. Roland H. Spaulding
For Forty Years Of Continuous, Outstanding, And Pioneering Contributions In Aerospace Education To The Youth Of The Nation, As A Classroom Teacher And As An Educational Administrator; For His Dynamic And Inspiring Teaching Of Thousands Of Students And Teachers; For His Efforts In Organizing And Directing Aerospace Education Workshops For Teachers; For His Active Participation And Unstinted Service As A Member And As An Officer Of Numerous Aerospace Organizations And Committees, Many Of Which He Is A Charter Member; And For His Leadership And Perseverance—Resulting In Significant Achievements—In Fostering The Inclusion Of Aviation And Space Concepts In Educational Systems Throughout The Nation.

1968
Joseph T. Geuting, Jr.
For More Than 20 Years Of Dedicated Involvement In Numerous National Aerospace Education Programs, And Particularly For His Influential And Innovative Leadership In General Aviation Through Encouraging Industry's Active Participation In Aerospace Education To Enrich The School Curricula And Give To The Youth Of Our Nation A Deeper Understanding Of The Meaning Of Flight And Its Impact Upon Their Lives.

1969
James H. Straubel
For Outstanding Contributions To The Growth And Development Of Aerospace Education In The United States And Abroad--As A Stimulant, Catalyst And Innovator--During More Than Two Decades, Both As Executive Director Of The Air Force Association And Of The Aerospace Education Foundation. 

1970
Dr. Walter Zaharevitz
For His Unflagging Endeavors In Developing And Introducing Aviation And Space Concepts To The Youth Of The Nation. His Demonstrated Ability In Managing The National Aerospace Education Council, His Writing And Creative Abilities And His Continuing Contributions To Education Throughout His Distinguished Career As An Aerospace Education Leader.

1971
Professor Harold S. Wood
For His Unselfish Dedication To The Cause Of Youth Aviation And Education As A Teacher At Parks College For Nearly A Quarter Of A Century And, Specifically, For His Leadership And Exemplary Efforts In Founding And Nurturing The National Intercollegiate Flying Association And Alpha Eta Rho.

1972
Dr. Wayne O. Reed
As One Of The Nation's Foremost Exponents In Aerospace Education On Both The State And National Level, He Has Been Instrumental In Introducing Millions Of Young People Into An Understanding Of The Air Age.

1973
Dr. Frederick B. Tuttle
For Three Decades Of Outstanding Contributions To Air Age Education And Training In The Civil Aeronautics Administration, The Field Of Higher Education, The National Aeronautics And Space Administration And Through The National Aerospace Education Association. Hundreds Of Thousands Of Elementary And Secondary School Pupils And Teachers Have Benefited From His Innovative Leadership In Aviation And Space Education.

1974
Dr. Wayne R. Matson
For His Outstanding Contributions To The Field Of Aerospace Education Over The Years Serving As Educator, Author, Lecturer, Pilot And Consultant; Working For The Educational Community As Well As Government And Industry In The Furtherance Of Aerospace Education; And Most Recently For Creating, Launching And Serving As Editor-In- Chief Of The Directory And The Journal Of Aerospace Education.

1975
Dr. Leslie L. Thomason
For His Dedication In The Development Of Creative And Imaginative Aviation Education Programs In Government, Industry And The Academic Community Which Have Impacted And Enlightened Millions Of People Throughout The World About Air Transportation.

1976
Dr. J. Wesley Crum
For His Dedication, Enthusiasm And Contributions To Aviation And Space Education Over The Past 20 Years, And Specifically For His Sensitive Responses And Creative Leadership Which Has Become A Standard For All To Respect And Emulate.

1977
The Honorable Don H. Clausen
For Outstanding Leadership And Performance In A Number Of Activities In Furthering Aviation And Space Education, Including Chairmanship Of The California Task Force On Aerospace Aviation Education. He Also Authored Federal Legislation Establishing A Civil Aviation Information Distribution Program Designed To Provide State And Local School Administrators And College University Officials With Information Materials And Expertise On Various Aspects Of Civil Aviation.

1978
Michael Collins, Under Secretary Of The Smithsonian Institution And The Team Of People He Assembled While Serving As Director Of The National Air And
Space Museum.
He Was Elected For Having Put Into Place A Vibrant And Exciting Education Apparatus Available To Every Citizen Reminding Americans Of Their Proud Heritage Of Aviation And Space Accomplishments, And Inspiring Young People To Help Contribute New Advancements In Aeronautics And Astronautics.

1979
Paul H. Poberezny, Executive Director And President, Experimental Aircraft Association.

For Outstanding Promotion Of Aviation Education For The Young For Over A Quarter Of A Century; For The Motivational Impact His Aviation Programs Have Had On Thousands Of Young Americans; For His Initiating "Project Schoolflight," The Program Of Building An Aircraft In The Schools; For Inspiring Air Minded Youth To Work With Hand And Mind Toward A Common Goal, The Completion Of An Airplane.


1980
Florida Institute Of Technology And Dr. Jerome P. Keuper, President And Founder Of Florida Institute Of Technology.
For Outstanding Contributions Of Enduring Value To Aerospace Education In The United States. Florida Institute Of Technology Is Unique As It Is The Only University In The United States Offering Both Aviation And Space Science Programs And Is The Only Independent Technological University In The United States.

1981
Edward W. Stimpson
For Over A Decade Of Outstanding Leadership In Aviation Education. He Has Personally Been Involved In Instigating And Promoting Programs For Teachers, Students, Pilots And The General Public. His Efforts Have Been Felt In High Schools, Colleges, Flight Schools And Aviation Safety Seminars, And Have Involved Motion Pictures, Slide Presentations, Radio, Television And National Magazine Features.

1982
John V. Sorenson
For His Ability To Combine Superior Qualities As Organizer, Administrator, Educator And Orator, Together With His Practical Wartime Experience As A Fighter Pilot Has Enabled Him To Accomplish Outstanding Improvements In Many Aeronautical Organizations, Including The Civil Air Patrol, The National Congress On Aerospace Education And The World Aerospace Education Organization. His Devotion To Constantly Learning More About Aeronautics And Sharing His Knowledge With Others, Nationally And Internationally, Has Provided Outstanding Improvements In Aerospace Education. The Whole Science And Art Of Flight Has Been Advanced Through His Capabilities And Dedication.

1983
Senator Barry M. Goldwater
For A Lifetime Of Devotion, Participation And Extraordinary Support Of All Elements Involved In Aerospace Activities And Education. He Has Had A Profound Individual As Well As Professional Impact On Aerospace Education During His Many Years As A Pilot And A United States Senator.

1984
Mary Jo Knouff
For Outstanding Contributions To The Growth And Development Of Aerospace Education, Across The Entire Spectrum, From The Grass Roots To High Government And Industry Levels.

1985
Charles Alfred (Chief) Anderson
For Nearly Six Decades Of Aerospace Education Leadership; Attracting, Motivating And Educating The Youth Of The Nation; And Exemplifying The Very Spirit And Purpose Of The Frank G. Brewer Trophy.

1986
Dr. Paul A. Whelan
For His Outstanding Contributions And Enduring Commitment To Aviation And Space Education In Both The Military And Civilian Sectors.

1987
Dr. John D. Odegard
For His Distinguished And Inspiring Leadership In Creating New Educational Opportunities For Future Aerospace Professionals. Moreover He Has Contributed Immensely To The Aviation Training And Motivation Of Young People And Strengthening Of The Nation's Air Transportation System.

1988
Dr. Curtis M. Graves
For His Many Years Of Outstanding Aviation/Space Educational Leadership In The National Aeronautics And Space Administration (Nasa) Education And Governmental Affairs Programs. His Efforts Resulted In Inspiring Millions Of Young People And Thousands Of Educators And Public Officials.

1989
(No Award Was Given) 

1990
Lockhart J. Smith Jr.
For His Lifetime Contribution Of Motivating, Inspiring, And Teaching Aerospace Sciences, Aircraft Design, Construction, And Maintenance To Two Generations Of Students At Wentworth Institute Of Technology In Boston, Ma. He Epitomizes The Very Best Of The Many Thousands Of Dedicated Aerospace Educators And Leaders Who Motivate Our Young Men And Women To Take Up Careers In Aviation. Without The Dedication Of Educators Like Lockhart Smith, The United States Could Not Have Achieved Its Position Of Worldwide Leadership In Aviation And Space.

1991
Kenneth L. Tallman
For Over 40 Years Of Creative Leadership, Personal Accomplishments And Professional Contributions To Aviation And Space Education. As Superintendent Of The U.S. Air Force Academy, As President Of The Spartan School Of Aeronautics And As President Of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, He Has Been Instrumental In Developing And Delivering Aviation And Space Education To Thousands Of Today's Aviation Professionals.

1992
Dr. Wallace R. Maples
For Outstanding Contributions Of Enduring Value In The Field Of Aviation And Aerospace Education In The United States And Internationally. Dr. Maples Has Provided Leadership In Aerospace Education For Teachers, Managers, Administrators, Pilots, And Aviation Maintenance Personnel. His Aviation Education Programs Have Served As Models For Many Other Colleges And Universities In The United States And Overseas.

1993
Gary W. Kiteley
For Outstanding Contributions Of Enduring Value In The Field Of Aviation And Aerospace Education In The United States And Internationally. Among Many Notable Achievements, Mr. Kiteley Has Enhanced The Quality Of Aviation Education Through The Development Of Airway Science Curriculum And The Creation Of The Council On Aviation Accreditation.

1994
Raymond J. Johnson
For Nearly A Half-Century Of Leadership And Innovation In Aviation And Aerospace Education At All Levels, Kindergarten Through University. His Pioneering Leadership Has Been Demonstrated At The Local Community Level, As Well As State, Regional, National And International Levels. His Work Involved Stimulating Volunteers In Civil Air Patrol's Programs As Well As Educators At All Grade Levels And Curricular Areas. He Is Also Recognized As An Author And Editor.

1995
Dr. Thomas J. Connolly
For 32 Years Of Continuous Outstanding Classroom Teaching, Significant National Leadership, And Unique Accomplishments In Aviation Education At All Levels. As Professor, Chair, And Dean Of Aviation At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University He Has Played A Key Role In The Development Of The Largest Professional
Pilot College Degree Program In The World.

1996
Jack K. Barker
For More Than 30 Years Of Service And Dedication To Aerospace Education So That The Next Generation Of Americans Will Know And Appreciate The Economic And Social Importance Of Aviation To The Nation. Jack Barker’s Continuing, Life Long Dedication To Aviation And Space Education Has Pioneered The Development Of Aerospace Education. His Efforts Have Received National Recognition And Impacted Millions Of School Children Nationwide.

1997
Dr. Frank G. Mitchell
For Lifetime Service To Aviation Education As An Aviation Industry Representative, Educator, Volunteer, And Friend To Teachers, Students, And Numerous Individual Whose Lives Have Been Touched By The Strength And Belief That He Has In Making A Difference In Our Children’s Futures.

1998
Gordon B. Hoff
For His National Leadership And Tireless Efforts Towards The Advancement Of Aviation Education For Children Of All Ages.

1999
Russell W. Watson
In Recognition Of 35 Years Of Contributions Made To The Advancement Of Aviation Education As A Developer And Leader Of Innovative Programs For National Organizations, And As An Unselfish Mentor To Teachers, Students And Numerous Others By Providing Ideas And Encouragement For Their Success.
 

2000
Nasa Spacelink Team
In Recognition Of Nasa Spacelink Team's Contributions To The Educational Community For Over A Decade Of Service Of Providing Electronic Access To Nasa Aeronautics And Space-Related Information And Educational Materials. 

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: Nominations and endorsement letters must be received by December 31. They should be sent to NAA at 1815 N. Fort Myer Drive, Suite 500, Arlington, VA 22209-1805. While FAXED nominations will be accepted, they are discouraged since the quality of the print can be marginal. Fax number is (703) 527-0229. All materials submitted become property of the NAA. 

Presentation of Award:

The Frank G. Brewer Trophy is presented at an appropriate ceremony as determined by the President of the National Aeronautic Association, usually at the National Congress on Aviation and Space Education.

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Award: 

The Robert J. Collier Trophy of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Robert J. Collier Trophy, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c. The National Aeronautic Association’s Collier Trophy is named for Robert J. Collier. In addition to an aviator, humanitarian, and sportsman, Mr. Collier was a prominent publisher whose family created the popular “Colliers Weekly.” Robert Collier commissioned the trophy in 1910 with the intent to encourage the American aviation community to strive for excellence and achievement in aeronautic development.


In recognizing the worth and future of aviation, Mr. Collier proclaimed the ideal that, “The flying machine should be unselfishly and rapidly developed to its ultimate potential for America’s economic advancement.” In support of his statement, Collier was the first person to purchase an airplane from the Wright brothers for personal use. Shortly thereafter, he “loaned” his aircraft to the U.S. Army for flight evaluations at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas, which led to the first military orders for a flying machine.

Robert J. Collier died in 1918 after completing his military service in World War I. By resolution of the National Aeronautic Association, successor to the Aero Club of America, the trophy was named for him. 

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients: In 1911, the very first recipient of the NAA’s Collier Trophy was Glenn H. Curtiss for his achievements in the development of the hydro-aeroplane. Since then, NAA has annually selected those responsible for the greatest accomplishments in aviation and space and honored them with the Collier.

The history of the Collier Trophy is very much the history of American aviation. Collier winners compose the who’s who of flying world -- Orville Wright, Elmer Sperry, Lawrence Bell and Chuck Yeager, Neil Armstrong and “Buzz” Aldrin, and Jeana Yeager and Burt Rutan to name just a few of the individuals. 

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: June 30.


Award: 

The Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c. Origin. In 1948, the National Aeronautic Association (NAA) established this award to honor the memory of both Orville and Wilbur Wright. The association created the Wright Memorial Trophy, which has been awarded by the President of NAA annually on the anniversary of the historic first flight. 

d. Criteria. The Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to a living American for "significant public service of enduring value to aviation in the United States."
The words "public service" are interpreted to include either (1) public service whether as a full time employee of government or as an unpaid volunteer serving on a government commission or agency,
or (2) service which made a major contribution of enduring value to the public. The word "aviation" should be interpreted broadly to include aerospace activities.
 

e. Presentation. The Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy Is Presented Annually By Agreement On, Or About, The 17th Of December (Anniversary Of The First Successful Flight Of An Airplane) By The President Of The National Aeronautic Association At The Aero Club of Washington's Annual Wright Brothers Memorial Banquet. 

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients

1948
Dr. William F. Durand
Dean Of American Aeronautical Engineers Who Developed The Basic Theories For Aircraft Propeller Design And Primary Force In The Establishment Of The National Advisory Committee For Aeronautics.

1949
Charles A. Lindbergh
For His Long And Selfless Career In Aviation.

1950
Grover Loening
Who, Over A Period Of More Than 40 Years, Has Served Aviation As A Student, A Pilot, An Engineer, A Manufacturer, An Author, A Consultant, And An Advisor.

1951
Dr. Jerome C. Hunsaker
For His Long Career In Public Service In The Field Of Aviation Dating Back To 1913. He Established The First Course Of Instruction For Aeronautical Engineers At Massachusetts Institute Of Technology And Also Designed And Built A Pioneer Wind Tunnel For Educational And Research Purposes. He Was A Founder And First President Of The Institute Of The Aeronautical Sciences. He Has Been Chairman Of Naca Continuously From 1941 To Present.

1952
Lt. Gen. James H. Doolittle, Usaf
For His Service In A Civilian Capacity Which Contributed To The Progress Of American Aviation, Dating Back To His 1924 Graduation From M.I.T. With An Aeronautical Engineering Degree. For Development Of Fog-Flying Equipment And Making The First Successful Flight, Including Takeoff And Landing, While In A Completely Covered Cockpit Of An Airplane. He Organized Afa And Was The First President Of That Organization.

1953
Honorable Carl Hinshaw
For His Service As A Member Of The House Of Representatives In Fostering The Sound And Consistent Growth Of Aviation In All Its Forms, So That It Might Become A Deterrent To War And That It Might Increasingly Become An Important Carrier Of The People And The Commerce Of The World.

1954
Dr. Theodore Von Karman
For Providing Many Of The Foundation Stones Leading To The Development Of Supersonic Aircraft And Guided Missiles. No Other Man Has Had A Greater Influence On The Development Of High Speed Aircraft In The United States.

1955
Dr. Hugh L. Dryden
For His Pioneering Work In The Field Of Supersonic Research. His Studies Of Turbulence In Wind Tunnels And Of The Mechanics Of Air Flow Within The Boundary Layer Made Contributions Of Enduring Value To Aviation In The United States. He Has Had A Distinguished Career Devoted Entirely To The Public Service.

1956
Dr. Edward P. Warner
For Continuous Achievements Over A Broad Range Of Aviation Since 1917.

1957
Senator Stuart Symington
For Significant Public Service Of Enduring Value To Aviation In The United States. Based Upon His Distinguished Career Of Pubic Service In The Field Of Aviation, A Career That Began Early In 1941. His Belief In Aviation, The Energy And Perseverance With Which He Has Consistently Fought For Air Power Objectives, His High Statesmanship, And His Outstanding Public Service All Combine To Make Him A Most Deserving Recipient Of The Trophy.

1958
Dr. John Frederick Victory
In The Building Of The Organization (Naca) That Was Selected To Be The Nucleus Of The New National Aeronautics And Space Administration, He Has Exerted A Driving Influence To Advance The Progress Of Aeronautics In America And To Promote The Public Interest. This He Has Done Quietly And Effectively With, At Times, Extraordinary Courage, Vision, And Ability. His Long Record Of Unselfish Service As A Civilian To Aeronautics Is Indeed Significant And Is Of Enduring Value To Aviation.

1959
William P. Maccracken, Jr.
Pioneer In Aviation Legislation, He Has Been A Driving Influence In The Evolution Of The Air And Has, Throughout His Life, Worked With Great Vision And Ability In Providing A Sound Legal Foundation For The Development Of Civil And Commercial Aviation In America. His Long Period Of Unselfish Service Is Truly Significant And Of Enduring Value To Aviation. His Notable Contributions Fully Qualify Him For The Award Of The Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy.

 1960
Frederick C. Crawford
Nationally-Known Engineer And Industrial Leader Who Has Served The United States Government On Many Occasions And A Number Of Years, He Was A Member Of The National Advisory Committee For Aeronautics (Now Known As Nasa) And Served As Chairman Of Naca's Committee On Power Plants For Aircraft. Currently, He Is Chairman Of The Trw Corporation Which Offers Talented Scientific Services To The Nation. 

1961
A. S. Mike Monroney
For More Than Three Decades Of Public Service Dedicated To The Advancement, Safety, And Equitable Regulation Of Aviation In This Country, First As A Member Of The House Of Representatives, Then As A Member Of The United States Senate. Some Examples Of His Aviation Leadership Are: His Continuous Emphasis On Air Safety, His Pressure For Further Advancement In The Art Of Air Navigation And Traffic Control, His Leadership In The Fields Of Air Cargo Development, And The Foresight That Has Put Him In The Vanguard Of Airport Development Throughout The Country For Over A Decade.

 

1962
John Stack
For His Outstanding Career And Reputation For Spearheading Advancement Into The Supersonic Flight Regimes.

 

1963
Donald W. Douglas, Sr.
For His Many Services To The Nation And Contributions To The Advancement Of Aviation As A Public Servant. Probably Best Known For His Role As The "Father" Of The Famous Dc-3 Transport, The Plane Which Ushered In A New Era Of Air Travel Comfort And Convenience During The Mid-1930s, Carried The Logistics Of Global War During World War Ii And, Today, Still Serves As A Feeder Airline And Business Aircraft.

 

1964
Harry F. Guggenheim
For Almost Half A Century, He Has Devoted A Very Considerable Part Of His Time To Advancing The Science And Practice Of Flight. The Daniel Guggenheim Fund For The Promotion Of Aeronautics, Which He Administered, Sponsored Schools Of Aeronautics At New York University, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, California Institute Of Technology, Georgia School Of Technology, And Others. The Daniel And Florence Guggenheim Foundation, Through His Personal Leadership, Sponsored And Supported Jet Propulsion Centers At California Institute Of Technology And Princeton, And For More Than A Decade, Was The Sole Financial Supporter Of Professor Robert H. Goddard, Father Of Modern Rocketry.

 

1965
Jerome Lederer
Aviation's Extraordinary Safety Record To A Significant Degree Is A Result Of His Tireless And Devoted Efforts. For 35 Years, He Has Worked Unceasingly To Improve All Elements Of The Flight Safety Spectrum And Concentrated On Making Compatible The Primary Elements Of Flight — The Man, The Machine, And The Ground Environment — To Ensure Maximum Safety. In Accomplishing This Objective, He Has Taken The Leadership In Correlating, Coordinating, And Improving The Flight Safety Activities Of The Many Varied Organizations And Agencies Comprising World Aviation. For These Selfless And Inspired Contributions, He Has Received Virtually Every National And International Safety Award.

 

1966
Juan Terry Trippe
For Significant Public Service Of Enduring Value To Aviation In The United States. Through His Vision And Practicality, He Has Played A Unique Role In Helping To Revolutionize Air Travel And Promote International Commerce And Goodwill. More Than Any Other Man, He Pushed The U.S. Into International Air Transportation, Where It Is Now The Model For Progress, Efficiency And Safety. Through His 40 Years Of Leadership, He Has Pioneered Flight Technology And Accelerated The Development Of New Aircraft, From The Famous China Clippers Of The Pacific Routes To The Supersonic Jets Of Tomorrow.

 

1967
Dr. Igor I. Sikorsky
For Public Service Of Significant And Enduring Value To Aviation Through The Design And Production Of The World's First Practical Helicopter, The Conception And Construction Of The First Successful Multi-Engined Aircraft, And The Design And Production Of A Series Of Amphibian Aircraft That Pioneered Transoceanic Air Transportation.

 

1968
Senator Warren G. Magnuson
For More Than Two Decades Of Dynamic Leadership In Developing National And International Policy That Has Assured United States' Preeminence In Aeronautics Throughout The World And Has Contributed Immeasurably To The Health And Vitality Of America's Economic Structure.

 

1969
William M. Allen
For Significant Public Service In The Development Of Commercial Airlines, Civil And Military Aircraft, And For Outstanding Leadership And Foresight In Establishment Of Policies And Programs Which Have Made Possible United States' Preeminence In Today's Dynamic Aviation Environment.

 

1970
C. R. Smith
For Significant Public Service Of Enduring Value In Development Of Military And Civil Air Transportation And For His Contributions As A Dynamic Leader And Articulate Spokesman For U.S. Aviation Progress.

1971
Senator Howard W. Cannon
For His Continuing Energetic Advocacy Of, And Lasting Contributions To, The Development And Use Of Aviation, Both As A Viable National Transportation System And As An Essential Element In Maintaining A Strong Military Posture.

1972
John H. Shaffer
In Recognition Of His Outstanding Leadership Of The Worldwide Operations Of The Federal Aviation Administration, Which Has Greatly Enhanced All Aspects Of U.S. Aviation To The Benefit And Safety Of The General Public And Of All Who Fly.

1973
Senator Barry M. Goldwater
For His Leadership And Inspiration To All Elements Of Aviation In The United States, Both Military And Civilian, And For Serving As An Articulate Spokesman For American Aviation And Space In The Congress And Throughout The World.

1974
Dr. Richard T. Whitcomb
For His Innovative Research Through The Years Which Has Led To Major Advancements In High Speed Flight And Continued Technological Leadership Of U.S. Aviation.

1975
Clarence L. (Kelly) Johnson
For His Vital And Enduring Contributions Over A Period Of 40 Years To The Design And Development Of Military And Commercial Aircraft.

1976
William Allan Patterson
For His Contributions To The Development Of Safe And Efficient Air Transportation Over The Past Half Century.

1977
Ira C. Eaker
For 60 Years Of Significant Public Service: As Pioneer Flyer, Military Leader, Industry Executive, And As A Persuasive Interpreter Of Aviation To The American People Through The Written And Spoken Word.

1978
Senator
Jennings Randolph
For His Distinguished Support Of Aviation In The U.S. By Successful Initiation And Advocacy Of Major Aviation Legislation Over More Than Three Decades Of Service In Congress, And As An Airline Executive.

1979
T. A.
Wilson
Chairman Of The Board And Chief Executive Officer Of The Boeing Company. For Distinguished And Enduring Contributions To The Growth Of American Aviation As An Essential Element Of National Security And Economic Growth.

 

1980
Olive Ann Beech
Chairman Of The Board Of Beech Aircraft Corporation. For Five Decades Of Outstanding Leadership In The Development Of General Aviation.

 

1981
Dwane L. Wallace
Former Chairman And Ceo Of Cessna Aircraft. For Significant Public Service Of Enduring Value To Aviation In The United States.

 

1982
Willis M. Hawkins
For His Vision, Imagination, And Dedication In More Than 40 Years Of Public Service To Aviation Through Technical Innovations And Management Leadership In The Design, Development, And Production Of Military And Commercial Aircraft, Space Vehicles, And Advanced Missilery.

 

1983
John Leland Atwood
In Recognition Of His Leadership In The Development Of Air And Space Vehicles, Spanning More Than Five Decades, And His Significant Contributions In The Public Interest To The Art Of Management In American Industry.

 

1984
David S. Lewis
For His Lifetime Contributions To Military Aviation And National Defense, And His Untiring Efforts In The Design, Development, And Production Of Superior Combat Aircraft.

 

1985
Harry Combs
For Over Half A Century Of Significant And Enduring Contributions To Aviation As A Pilot, An Industrial Leader, An Author, And An Advisor To Government.

 

1986
Joseph F. Sutter
In Recognition Of A Career In Aviation, Spanning More Than Four Decades, During Which His Technical Leadership And Management Skills Were Instrumental In The Development Of Three Generations Of Advanced Transports Which Contributed Significantly To U.S. Preeminence In Civil Aeronautics.

 

1987
Allen E. Paulson
For His Outstanding And Enduring Contributions To Aviation As A Pilot, Designer, Entrepreneur, Industry Leader, And Employer Throughout A Career Spanning Over 40 Years.

 

1988
Dr. Sam B. Williams
For Significant And Enduring Contributions To Aviation And National Defense Over A Period Of 35 Years. His Invention And Production Of Small, Lightweight Gas-Turbine Engines, And His Leadership In The Introduction And Processing Of New Technology And New Materials Have Provided Major Impetus To U.S. Aviation Progress.

 

1989
Thomas V. Jones
For His Achievements, Over A Period Of 47 Years, In Guiding The Development Of Advanced Aircraft, Electronic Systems, And Manufacturing Technologies. Visionary, Bold Designer, Planner, Engineer, And Manger, He Has Significantly Enhanced The Defense And Air Transportation Capacity Of The United States.

 

1990
Edwin I. Colodny
For A Lifetime Of Meritorious Service To Air Transportation As An Airline Executive And Public Servant.

 

1991
Benjamin A. Cosgrove
For A Lifetime Contribution To Commercial Aviation Safety And To The Technology Development Of Four Generations Of Boeing Commercial Jet Transport Aircraft.

 

1992
Senator Jake Garn
In Recognition Of A Lifetime Of Public Service In Government And Active Participation In All Segments Of U.S. Aviation — As A Military And Civilian Pilot, Astronaut, And As One Of The U.S. Senate's Most Effective Aerospace Spokesmen And Legislators.

 

1993
Gerhard Neumann
For Extraordinary Achievement, Creative Effort, And Inspired Leadership In The Design And Development Of Aircraft Engines And Their Applications For Tens Of Thousands Of Commercial And Military Aircraft In Worldwide Use.

 

1994
A. L. Ueltschi
For Advancement Of Worldwide Aviation Safety Through Sophisticated Training Methods, And Use Of Aviation To Deliver State-Of-The-Art Health Care To People Otherwise Deprived Of Such High Quality Medical Service.

 

1995
Russell W. Meyer, Jr.
For Leadership In The Revitalization Of General Aviation, Effective Public Service, And Active Involvement In The Creation And Support Of Innovative Aviation-Related Programs And Opportunities For The Disadvantaged And Disabled.

 

1996
Frederick W. Smith
For His Unique And Lasting Contributions To Aviation And Public Service Worldwide And His Leadership, Moral Values, And Pioneering Spirit Which Represent In The Best Sense The Traditions Of The Wright Brothers.

 

1997
Charles H. Kaman
For More Than 50 Years Of Contributions To The Development Of Rotary-Wing Aviation, And A Lifetime Of Service To His Country As An Engineer, Entrepreneur, Visionary, And Humanitarian.

 

1998
Edward W. Stimpson
For Uniquely Effective Leadership In The Field Of General Aviation, Dedicated Public Service, And Active Involvement In Creating Career Opportunities For Young Men And Women.

 

1999
Delford M. Smith
For Exceptional Achievements In Creation Of Worldwide Aviation Enterprises, Lifelong Commitment To National Security And Humanitarian Concerns, Highest Integrity And Leadership Standards, And Preservation Of Aviation History For Future Generations.

 

2000
Herbert D. Kelleher

For Building Southwest Airlines' Revolutionary And Successful Model For Low Fares, Innovative Customer Service And Employee Recognition; A Model Emulated Throughout The World. Commercial Aviation Will Forever Be Enriched.
 

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division. The Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy Selection Committee is appointed annually by the President of the National Aeronautic Association and consists of seven members, which includes the President, Chairman, Administrator, or a representative of each of the following:

National Aeronautic Association
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Air Transport Association
Aerospace Industries Association
American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics
Aero Club of Washington
The Aviation Press
 

Deadline date: Nominations must be received at the offices of NAA not later than AUGUST 30. In fairness to others, nominations received after this date will not be considered.
 



Award: 

The Katherine & Marjorie Stinson Trophy of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Katherine & Marjorie Stinson Trophy, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c. This award from the National Aviation Club recognizes a living woman for an outstanding and enduring contribution, a meritorious flight, or a singular technical development in the fields of aviation, aeronautics, space, or related sciences.

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: June 30. 


Award: 

The Cliff Henderson Award of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA).

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Cliff Henderson Award, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c. This award from the National Aviation Club recognizes an individual or group whose vision, leadership, or skill has made a significant and lasting contribution to the promotion and advancement of aviation or space activity. . 

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: June 30.


Award: 

The Katherine Wright Memorial Award of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Origin. This award was established in 1981 by the Gates Learjet Corporation. The original intent was that this award would be made annually to a woman who, behind the scenes, provided encouragement, support and inspiration to her husband, and thus was instrumental in his success.

c. The award is now made annually to a woman who has:
Provided encouragement, support and inspiration to her husband and thus was instrumental in his success or made a personal contribution to the advancement of the art, sport and science of aviation and space flight over an extended period of time.

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: The National Aeronautic Association annually solicits nominations for this award from among aviation organizations and interested individuals throughout the United States.  

Past Recipients

1981
Moya Lear

1982
Ann Morrow Lindbergh

1983-1989
Award Inactive


1990
Achsa B. Peacock Donnels

1991
Olive Ann Beech

1992
Elizabeth Pfister
For lifetime contribution to the advancement of the art, sport and science of aviation

1993
June De Etta Maule
For lifetime achievement in aircraft manufacturing by providing encouragement, support, inspiration, and management skills to her husband, B. D. Maule, and to their business of manufacturing Maule aircraft for over 50 years.

1994
Nadine Jeppesen
For loving wife and partner in the development of the Jeppesen Airway Manual

1995
Audrey Poberezny
For her 32 years of service to the sport aviation movement and for playing an integral and continuing role in the founding of the Experimental Aircraft Association in 1953

1996
Virginia M. "Ginny" Schweizer
For being a soaring pioneer and a record breaking soaring pilot who was also involved in various aspects of commercial sailplane operations, as well as having provided encouragement, support and inspiration to her husband to her husband, Paul A. Schweizer, in various phases of his aviation career

1997
Doris Lockness
For her aeronautical achievements during the past 50 years inspiring all who know her to set and attain higher goals as aviation professionals, and for many others to enter various fields of aviation.

1998
Romana Ann Ardaiz
For support of her husband’s aviation career over the past 50 years, including coaching during his studies, meeting the challenges of pioneering Alaska, believing in his dreams, and providing encouragement to achieve them.

1999
Athley Gamber
For her pioneering contributions to the furtherance of aviation, span more than a half century; for being instrumental in her family’s efforts to create a wide variety of general aviation businesses including aircraft sales, service, flight training, and charter airline companies; for providing support for a number of record-breaking flights; for being successful in expanding both the cope and quality of the family owned operations following her husband’s tragic death; and for her caring attitude and positive influence on the lives of so many that are now involved in aviation.

 

2000
Carroll W. Suggs
For being both: Instrumental to her husband’s success in the development of Petroleum Helicopters Inc. from her marriage to Robert L. Suggs in 1970: and Personally responsible for the continued growth And improvements – notably in safety, employee satisfaction, and business diversification – of Petroleum Helicopters, Inc. since Robert L. Suggs death in September 1989.
 

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: The selection is made in April of each year by a Committee appointed by the President of NAA.


Presentation
The formal presentation of the award takes place at the annual meeting of the Ninety-Nines, Inc. which is normally scheduled in July or August. The Trophy itself is on display at the offices of The Ninety-Nines, Inc. in Oklahoma City.

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Award: 

The Mackay Trophy of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Mackay Trophy, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients:

1912
Lt. Henry H. Arnold

1913
2nd Lt. Joseph E. Carberry
2nd Lt. Fred Seydel
Reconnaissance

1914
Capt. Townsend F. Dodd
Lt. S. W. Fitzgerald
Reconnaissance

1915
Lt. B. Q. Jones
American duration record – one-man flight of 8 hours, 53 minutes, San Diego; and for World Record for 3 men (2 passengers) of 7 hours, 5 minutes, San Diego

1916-1917
No Award Presented

1918
Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker
For his official record in bringing down 16 enemy aircraft

1919
Lt. Belvin N. Maynard
Lt. Alexander Pearson, Jr.
Lt. R. S. Northington
Capt. John O. Donaldson
Capt. Lowell H. Smith
Lt. Col. Harold E. Hartney
Lt. E. M. Manzelman
Lt. B. G. Bagby
Lt. D. B. Gish
Capt. F. Steinle
For their flights between the Atlantic and Pacific and return

1920
Capt. St. Clair Streett
1st Lt. Clifford C. Nutt
2nd Lt. Eric H. Nelon
2nd Lt. C. H. Crumrine
2nd Lt. Ross C. Kirkpatrick
Sgt. Edmond Henriques
Sgt. Albert T. Vierra
Sgt. Joe E. English
For their flights to Nome, Alaska and return

1921
Lt. John A. Macready
World’s Altitude Record

1922
Lt. John A. Macready
Lt. Oakley G. Kelly
World’s Duration Record

1923
Lt. John A. Macready
Lt. Oakley G. Kelly
Non-Stop Trancontinental Flight

1924
Capt. Lowell H. Smith
1st Lt. Leslie P. Arnold
1st Lt. Leigh Wade
1st Lt. Eric H. Nelson
2nd Lt. Henry H. Ogden
For first round-the-world flight

1925
Lt. James H. Doolittle
Lt. Cyrus K. Bettis
For winning the Schneider and Pulitzer Races

1926
Pam American Good Will Flyers:
Maj. Herbert A. Dargue
Capt. Ira C. Eaker
Capt. Arthur B. McDaniel
Capt. C. F. Woolsey
1st Lt. J. W. Benton
1st Lt. Charles McRobinson
1st Lt. Muir S. Fairchild
1st Lt. Bernard S. Thompson
1st Lt. Leonard D. Weddingon
1st Lt. Ennis C. Whitehead
1927 Lt. Albert F. Hegenberger
Lt. Lester J. Maitland
For Hawaiian flight, June 28, 1927, in an Atlantic C.A.

1928
Lt. Harry A. Sutton
For his quiet bravery, intelligence, skill and spirit performing spinning tests of Observation planes

1929
Capt. A. W. Steven
For his mastery of the upper air and his use of long-range photography

1930
Maj. Ralph Royce
For the "Artic Patrol" flight of the First Pursuit Group from Selfridge Field to Spokane, Washington and return in January, 1930 during a period of extreme cold, snow and other bad flying and operating conditions, which resulted in valuable information being gathered concerning airplanes, equipment, and flying personnel carrying on under severe winter operating conditions.

1931
Brig Gen. Benjamin D. Foulois
As commander of 1st Air Division (Provisional) for its exercises in May 1931, flying for a total of approximately 40,000 hours, suffered no loss of life or serious injury to any participating personnel

1932
11th Bombardment Squadron of March Field, California
1st Lt. Charles H. Howard, Commanding Officer
For the Air Relief Mission to the snowbound Navajo and Hopi Indians in January

1933
Capt. Westside T. Larson
For his pioneering flights in connection with the development of methods and procedure of Aerial Frontier Defense during the year 1933

1934
Brig Gen Henry H. Arnold
As Commanding Officer of the Alaskan Flight (from Bolling Field, D. C. to Fairbanks, Alaska, of ten B-10 Bombers

1935
Capt. A. W. Stevens
Capt. O. A. Anderson
For World Balloon Record Stratosphere Flight to 72,395 feet

1936
Capt. Richard E. Nugent
1st Lt. Joseph A. Miller
1st Lt. Edwin G. Simenson
2nd Lt. William P. Ragsdale, Jr.
2nd Lt. Burton W. Armstrong
2nd Lt. Herbert Morgan, Jr.
Tech Sgt. Gilbert W. Olson
Staff Sgt. Howard M. miller
Cpl. Air Mechanic 2/c Frank B. Connor
For demonstration of expert instrument flying and navigation, and the will to overcome obstacles to accomplish their mission under exceptionally adverse weather conditions during a flight of three B-10’s from Langley Field, VA to Allegan, MI

1937
Capt. Carl J. Crane
Capt. George V. Holloman
For their successful development and demonstration flights of the Automatic Landing System

1938
Lt Col Robert Olds and the 2nd Bombardment Group of the Air Corps
For their Good Will Flight to Buenos Aires, Argentina and return

1939
Maj Caleb V. Haynes
Maj William D. Old
Capt John A. Samford
1st Lt. Richard S. Freeman
1st Lt. Torgils G. Wold
Tech Sgt. William J. Heldt
Tech Sgt Henry L. Hines
Tech Sgt David L. Spicer
Staff Sgt Russell E. Junior
Staff Sgt James E. Sands
M/Sgt Adolph Cattarius
For their flight in the B-15 from Langley Field, VA via Panama and Lima, Peru at the request of the American Red Cross, for the purpose of placing without delay, urgently needed vaccines and other medical supplies in areas of Chile devastated by an earthquake. Elapsed time: 40 hrs. 18 mins. Flying time: 29 hrs 53 mins. Great Circle Distance: 4,933 statue miles

1940 – 1946
No Awards Presented

1947
Capt. Charles E. Yeager
For the first supersonic Flight in the XS-1

1948
Lt. Col Emil Beadry
For the rescue of twelve marooned airmen from the Greenland Icecap

1949
Capt James G. Gallagher and flight crew of the Lucky Lady II
For the first around-the-world nonstop flight

1950
27th Fighter Wing
For planning and executing the mission of Fox Able Three involving movement of 180 jet fighter aircraft across the Atlantic

1951
Col Fred J. Ascani
For establishing a new world record of 635.686 mph in the 100 kilometer closed course event at the National Air Races

1952
Maj Louis H. Carrington, Jr.
Maj Frederick W. Shook
Capt Wallace D. Yancey
For the first non-stop trans-Pacific flight of an RB-45 multi-engine jet bomber type aircraft, a distance of 3,460 nautical miles in 9 hours, 50 minutes, with two air refuelings

1953
40th Air Division, Strategic Air Command
For deployment of 25 F-84G jet fighter aircraft, utilizing air refueling, under adverse conditions, flying non-stop from the continental United States to bases in the United Kingdom and North Africa

1954
308th Bombardment Wing (M), 38th Air Division, Strategic Air Command
For successfully completing a leap from intercontinental maneuver, a milestone in expanding and proving the combined operational capabilities of the B-47 bombardment aircraft and in determining fatigue limits of combat crews

1955
Col Horace A. Hanes
For establishing a world speed record of 822.135 mph in a F-100C aircraft at the National Air Show

1956
Capt. Iven C. Kincheloe, Jr., ARDC
For outstanding contributions to the science of aviation by flying the Bell X-2 aircraft to an altitude considerably higher than had ever been reached before in a piloted aircraft

1957
93rd Bombardment Wing, Strategic Air Command
For executing operation "Powerflight", the first jet around-the-world, nonstop record breaking flight by three B-52 aircraft

1958
Tactical Air Command’s Air Strike Force, X-Ray Tango
For its rapid and effective deployment to the troubled Far East during the fall of 1958

1959
4520th Aerial Demonstration Team (Thunderbirds)
For the goodwill tour of the Far East

1960
6593rd Test Squadron
For its first aerial recovery of an object from space orbit

1961
Lt Col William R. Payne
Maj William L. Polthemus
Maj Raymond R. Wagener
Of the 43rd Bomb Wing, Strategic Air Command
For their historic nonstop flight from Carswell AFB, Texas to Paris, France, which culminated in the establishment of two international speed records

1962
Maj Robert G. Sowers
Capt Robert MacDonald
Capt John T. Walton
For the most meritorious flight of the year as members of a SAC B-58 crew which established three transcontinental speed records

1963
Crew of C-47 "Extol Pink"
Capt. Warren P. Tomsett
Capt John R. Ordemann
Capt Donald R. Mack
Tech Sgt Edson P. Inlow
Staff Sgt Jack E. organ
Staff Sgt Frank C. Barrett
For the evacuation of wounded troops in Viet Nam at night under enemy fire

1964
464th Troop Carrier Wing (TAC)
For its participation in the humanitarian airlift of some 1,500 hostages and refugees from rebel held territory in the Republic of Congo during November 1964

1965
YF-12A/SR-71 Test Force
Col Robert L. Stephens
Lt Col Daniel Andre
Lt Col Walter F. Daniel
Maj Noel T. Warner
Maj James P. Cooney
For the most meritorious flight of the year in the YF-12A aircraft, which culminated in the establishment of nine new world speed and altitude records

1966
Lt. Col Albert R. Howarth
For his exemplary courage and airmanship as pilot in a combat strike mission in southeast Asia under most hazardous conditions of darkness and intense enemy fire

1967
Maj John J. Casteel
Capt Dean L. Hoar
Capt Richard L. Trail
MSgt Nathan C. Campbell
of the Strategic Air Command
For their exemplary courage and outstanding aerial accomplishments by performing the first multiple air refueling between a KC-135 aircraft and an A-3 Navy tanker which simultaneously refueled a Navy F-8 Crusader under emergency fuel shortages and combat condition

1968
Lt Col Daryl D. Cole
For conspicuous gallantry as a C-130 pilot in the emergency evacuation of personnel in the Republic of Viet Nam

1969
49th Tactical Fighter Wing
For a flawless deployment of 72 F-4D aircraft from Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, to Holloman AFB, New Mexico without a single abort, completing 504 successful air-to-air refuelings on the 5,000 mile trip

1970
Capt Alan D. Milacek
Capt James A. Russell
Capt Roger E. Clancy
Capt Ronald C. Jones
Capt Brent C. O’Brien
TSgt Albert A. Nash
SSgt Adolfo Lopez, Jr.
SSgt Ronald R. Wilson
Sgt Kenneth E. Firestone
A1C Donnell H. Cofer
For their valor and perseverance in accomplishing a vital mission and returning their aircraft to its base despite severe damage.

1971
Lt Col Thomas B. Estes
Maj Dewain C. Vick
For their operation of an SR-71 aircraft which established new world records for duration and distance covered, thereby proving the extended supersonic reconnaissance capability of this aircraft

1972
Capt Richard S. Ritchie
Capt Charles B. DeBellevue
Capt Jeffrey S. Feinstein
For their extraordinary gallantry, superb airmanship, and intrepidity in the face of the enemy

1973
Operation Homecoming
Military Airlift Command Aircrews
For the diligent and dynamic efforts of each crewmember of Operation Homecoming, the return of the Prisoners of War to United States control

1974
Maj Roger J. Smith
Maj David W. Peterson
Maj Willard R. MacFarlane
For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as F-15 Advanced Tactical Fighter Test Pilots during Operation Streak Eagle during which time eight world class time-to-climb records were established

1975
Maj Robert W. Undorf
For conspicuous gallantry, initiative and resourcefulness during the joint military operation to rescue and insure the return of the SS Mayguez crew from an opposing armed force on Koh Tang, an island in the Gulf of Thailand

1976
Capt James W. Yule
For gallantry and unusual presence of mind while participating in a flight as an instructor pilot of a B-52D aircraft

1977
Capt David M. Sprinkel and crew of C-5 Aircrew Mission AAM 1962-01
The aircrew, composed of members from the 436th Military Airlift Wing and the 512th Military Airlift Wing, airlifted a large super conducting electromagnet, support equipment, and personnel in support of joint US-USSR energy research program

1978
Lt Col Robert F. Schultz and Crew
Capt Todd H. Hohberger and Crew
Members of C-5 Aircrew Mission AM 770021
Two C-5 aircrews composed of members from the 436th Military Airlift Wing distinguished themselves by conducting a history flight into Africa. This mission was the first C-5 airlift mission in support of the free world effort against rebel forces in Zaire

1979
Maj James E. McArdle, Jr.
For professional competence and aerial skill in rescuing 28 Taiwanese seamen from a sinking cargo ship

1980
Crews S-21 and S-31, 644the Bombardment Squadron, Strategic Air Command
For executing a nonstop, around-the world mission with the immediate objective of locating and photographing elements of the soviet Navy operating in the Arabian Gulf.

1981
Capt John J. Walters
For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as HH-3 Helicopter Commander in the rescue of 61, in adverse conditions, from the burning cruise ship "Prinsendam"

1982
B-52 Crew E-21, Strategic Air Command
Capt. Richard L. Cavendish
2nd Lt Frank A. Boyle
Capt Ronald D. Nass
1st Lt James D. Gray
1st Lt Michael J. Connor
Tech Sgt Ronald B. Wright
1st Lt Gerald E. Valentini
For successfully landing their crippled B-52, under almost impossible conditions, thereby saving their lives and a valuable aircraft.

1983
KC-135A Crew E-113 of the Strategic Air Command
Capt Robert J. Goodman
Capt Michael F. Clover
Capt Karol F. Wojcikowski
SSgt Douglas D. Simmons
For outstanding achievement while on a routine refueling mission involving F-4E aircraft, saving a valuable aircraft from destruction and its crew from possible death

1984
Lt Col James L. Hobson, Jr.
As aircraft commander of the lead MC-130E during the Grenada rescue mission

1985
Lt Col David E. Faught
For heroism and outstanding airmanship thus saving the lives of eight crewmembers and preventing the loss of an irreplaceable aircraft.

1986
Capt Marc D. Felman
Capt Thomas M. Ferguson
MSgt Clarence Bridges, Jr.
MSgt Patrick S. Kennedy
MSgt Gerald G. Treadwell
Tech Sgt Lester G. Bouler
Tech Sgt Gerald M. Lewis
SSgt Samuel S. Flores
SSgt Scott A. Helms
SSgt Gary L. Smith
For having flawlessly demonstrating the impressive capabilities and outstanding professionalism of the United States Air Force during and unprecedented and highly-demanding mission to the nuclear test site at Semipalatinsk, Soviet Central Asia

1987
Detachment 15, Air Force Plant Representative Office and B-1B System Program Office, Air Force Systems Command

1988
Military Airlift Wing C-5 Crew, Military Airlift Command

1989
96th Bombardment Wing B-1B Crew
Capt Jeffrey K. Beene
Capt Vernon B. Benton
Lt Col Joseph G. Day
Capt Robert H. Hendricks
For the first-ever gear-up emergency landing of a B-1B aircraft

1990
Crew of AC-130H, mission #1J1600GA354, 16th Special Operations Squadron, Air Force Special Operations Command
For airmanship and outstanding professionalism of the crew during aerial flight over the Republic of Panama during Operation JUST CAUSE

1991
MH-53J Pave Low Crew, 20th Special Operations Squadron. Hurlburt Field, Florida, Air Force Special Operations Command
Capt Thomas J. Trask
Maj Michael Homan
MSgt Timothy B. Hadrych
Tech Sgt Gregory Vanhyning
Tech Sgt James A. Peterson, Jr.
SSgt Craig Dock
Sgt Thomas W. Bedard
For extraordinary heroism and self-sacrifice of the crew during the rescue of a downed Navy F-14 pilot in Iraq.

1992
C-130 Aircrew, 310th Airlift Squadron, Howard AFB, Panama, Air Combat Command
Capt Peter B. Eunice
Capt Daniel G. Sobel
Capt Robert K. Stich
Maj Christopher J. Duncan
MSGT Joseph C. Beard, Jr.
MSgt Carl V. Wilson
TSgt John H. Armintrout
TSgt Charles G. Bolden
TSgt Rory E. Calhoun
TSgt Ray A. Fisher
TSgt Peter J. Paquette
TSgt Andrew W. Toth
TSgt Darren R. Tresler
SSgt Ronald P. Hetzel
For extraordinary resourcefulness and unusual presence of mind during an unprovoked attack in international airspace

1993
Crew E-21, 668th Bomb Squadron, Griffiss AFB, NY
Capt Jeffrey R. Swegel
Maj Peter B. Mapes
Capt Charles W. Patnaude
Lt Glen J. Caneel
Capt Joseph D. Rosmarin
For quick thinking, immediate reaction, and astute situational awareness enabling them to return a crippled B-52 aircraft to stable flight and safe landing

1994
Crew of Air Force Rescue 206:
Capt John W. Blumentritt
Capt Gary W. Henderson
SRA Jeffrey M. Frembling
SSGT Matthew A. Wells
SRA Jesse W. Goerz
Crew of Air Force Rescue 208:
Lt Col James A. Sills
Lt Col Gary L. Copsey
Lt Richard E. Assaf
TSgt Gregory M. Reed
SR William R. Payne
For extraordinary heroism and self-sacrifice during the rescue of six Icelandic sailors who were stranded when their ship foundered in heavy seas and strong winds

1995
Crew of BAT-01
Lt. Col. Doug Raaberg
Capt. Gerald Goodfellow
Capt. Kevin Clotfelter
Capt. Rick Carver
Capt. Chris Stewart
Capt. Steve Adams
Capt. Kevin Houdek
Capt. Steve Reeves
For the history-breaking, aerial achievement flight of the decade demonstrating the B-1B Global Power combat capability with live bombing activity and three bombing ranges on three continents in two hemispheres.

1996
Crew of Duke 01 Flight
For performing the first combat employment of the B-52H in history

1997
Crew of Whick-05
Lt Col Frank J. Kisner
Maj (Dr.) Robert S. Michaelson
Capt. John C. Baker
Capt Reed Foster
Capt Mark J. Ramsey
Capt Robert P. Toth
MSgt Gordon H. Scott
TSgt Tom L. Baker
SSgt John D. Hensdill
SSgt Jeffrey A. Hoyt
For overcoming hostile gunfire, three heavyweight air refuelings, and over 13 hours flying 3,179 nautical miles to their objective to insert a European Survey and Assessment Team and extract 56 people from the carnage and wanton violence in Brassaville, Republic of Congo, achieving this goal while on the ground for less than 23 minutes

1998
Crew of Air Force Rescue 470
For making a daring mountain-top rescue of six survivors trapped inside an airplane which had crashed on a glacier during a near-zero visibility approach in winds gusting to 45 knots.

1999
Capt Jeffrey G. J. Hwang
In recognition of an exceptionally meritorious F-15C flight during combat operations in support of Operation ALLIED FORCE when he simultaneously destroyed two enemy aircraft during a single intercept
 

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.  

Deadline date: June 30.


 Award: 

The Elder Statesman of Aviation Award of the National Aeronautic Association (NAA). 

a. The NAA, U.S. representative of the FAI, itself sponsors certain coveted awards in the American aviation world.  

b. Among these is the Elder Statesman Award, for which nominations are accepted from any division of NAA. See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

c Origin
The Elder Statesman of Aviation Award was established on October 16, 1954, by the Board of Directors of the National Aeronautic Association. The award is in the form of a handsome parchment certificate, suitably mounted, certifying the recipient's election as an Elder Statesman of Aviation. 

d Criteria For Award
The purpose of the Elder Statesman of Aviation Award is to honor outstanding Americans, who by their efforts over a period of years, have made contributions of significant value to aeronautics, and have reflected credit upon America and themselves.

A nominee for consideration as an Elder Statesman of Aviation shall:

a. Be a citizen of the United States, who, for at least 15 years, has been actively identified with aeronautics and has made contributions of significant value to aeronautics;

b. Have exhibited qualities of patriotism, integrity, and moral courage worthy of emulation;

c. Be at least 60 years of age; and

d. Be well and favorably known as a person of ability and character.
 

Eligibility: (See above).  

Awarded by: National Aeronautic Association 

Past Recipients:

See http://www.naa-usa.org/website/html/awardsset.html  

Submission procedures: (See above). Nominations must be made through USPA or another NAA division.

Deadline date: June 30.



Award: 

The Leo Stevens Medal of the Leo Stevens Award Committee.  

The Leo Stevens Award Committee, an independent group not affiliated with FAI or NAA, describes the medal as the “principal parachuting award,” given annually to the “individual or group who has made the most distinguished contribution to the saving of lives in aerial navigation by perfecting the parachute or other means of bringing individuals or disabled aircraft in safely to the ground, or in training and developing the art and use of such means.” See http://www.NAA-USA.org  

Eligibility: (See above) 

Awarded by: (See above) 

Past Recipients

Submission procedures

Deadline date: See http://www.naa-usa.org/website/html/awardsset.html


Award:

AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Award 

Eligibility:  

Awarded by:

American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics Aerodynamic Decelerator Technical Committee. http://www.aiaa.org/membership/index.hfm?mem=4  

Past Recipients:

Submission procedures

Deadline date:  

Note the AIAA has more than 50 awards divided into ten categories. Each category directs attention to a particular area of AIAA activity and has its own set of procedures for selection and bestowal. For details, contact Peter Gabriel, peterg@aiaa.org
  Drafted 4 Feb 01, Revised 4 Aug 01 by Dan Poynter.

Adopted 8 Sep 01, Niagara Falls, Ontario.  


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